DARA-T Workup

Daratumumab (Darzalex) is an IgG1k monoclonal antibody directed against CD38, which is over expressed on the plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma. Daratumumab binds to CD38 and causes apoptosis through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity or complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In 2015 the FDA approved daratumumab for the treatment of refractory multiple myeloma. Refractory meaning that patients have received at least three previous treatment protocols that failed to show sustained efficacy or any efficacy at all. Recently in May of 2018, the FDA approved daratumumab for first line therapy in combination with bortezomid, melphalan, and prednisone. The names of the drugs aren’t important, what is important is that this monoclonal antibody approach has become more common and now has moved into first line therapy meaning that more patients are going to receive this treatment. Its no secret that patients with multiple myeloma when undergoing treatment and throughout the course of the disease progression need blood component transfusions.

Typing and screening patients that are receiving daratumumab is extremely difficult and time consuming. The daratumumab not only binds to the CD38 on the malignant lymphoma cells, but it also binds to the red cells who express CD38. This causes interference in transfusion testing. Part of normal pre-transfusion testing is an antibody screen. An antibody screen is important as it tells the transfusion team if there are any alloantibodies. Alloantibodies are antibodie directed towards red cell antigens on the donor cells. If a patient has an alloantibody, it makes selecting red cells for transfusion difficult. Additional testing must be done to select antigen negative donor cells for the antibody that the recipient or the patient has. Daratumumab causes the antibody screen and corresponding antibody panel panreactive, including a positive autocontrol. This may mask any additional clinically significant alloantibody that the patient may have.

The blood bank team must perform testing prior to the patient receiving this daratumumab. The clinical team must be in communication with the blood bank. Before the patient receives the medication, the team must get a baseline type and screen. Normally they are negative, but in the off chance that they have an alloantibody, the blood bank can identify the antibody before daratumumab interferes with testing. Other testing must include a complete phenotype of the patients cell. A complete phenotype will identify all the antigens that are present on the patients cells. This tells the blood bank and clinician vital information. If the patient does NOT have the antigen present on their red cells, there is a chance that they can produce an antibody towards that antigen on donor cells making it hard to find correct donors for transfusion. For example, if the patient is negative for the E antigen, they may or may not develop an antibody towards the E antigen, so in the event that the donor red cells have the E antigen present, the patients antibody will attack those cells and cause a transfusion reaction. For the characteristics of different transfusion reactions, reference transfusion reactions.

Once the daratumumab has been given there are techniques that must be followed to obtain a sample that is suitable for testing. An enzyme called dithiothreitol (DTT) is used to negate the binding of DARA-T to CD38 on the red cell surface. This will allow for an antibody screen to be run. Unfortunately, DTT destroys the Kell antigen on the red cell surface. Kell is a clinically significant antibody in transfusions so its important to know whether or not if the patient has the antigen or not. Patients treated with DTT, MUST have Kell negative donor units, because of the risk of developing an anti-K antibody and not being able to identify it.

 

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Biotin Interference on Diagnostic Testing

biotin-b7

Biotin, also known as vitamin B7 is a coenzyme that is involved in carbon dioxide transfer in carboxylase reactions. The USDA recommended dietary reference intake for biotin is 30 ug per day which should mostly come from food. The last few years biotin has been marketed heavily as a beauty supplement. It is used in hair, skin, and nail supplements, and is not FDA regulated and is sold as over-the-counter. Biotin can be found in B-complex vitamins, multivitamins, prenatal vitamins, vitamin H, and vitamin B7 supplements. The only FDA recommended use for biotin is in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis who receive mega-doses of up to 300 mg per day. Even in such large doses biotin is considered nontoxic and has very little adverse effects.

The issue is that serum or plasma biotin may potentially interfere with any assay that uses biotin-streptavidin binding. Biotin is a small molecule that attaches covalently to a variety of targets with minimal effect on their biological activity. The biotin binding makes the target an easy capture because it forms a strong bond with avidin, streptavidin, and NeutrAvidin proteins who have an exceptionally high affinity for biotin. Biotin-streptavidin detection is a favorite among many immunoassays across many manufacturers including Roche, Ortho, Beckman, Siemens, and Dimension.

The direction of interference depends on the design of the assay. Some results may be falsely elevated, and some may be falsely decreased. The sandwich and competitive assays are among the most commonly impacted. Interference can occur with hormone tests such as parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4, T3, and even troponin tests.

Sandwich assays involve two antibodies that form a sandwich with the analyte being tested to be measured. The first antibody is labeled with a signal that can be quantified and the other antibody to the target is labeled with biotin. When the biotin:antibody complex binds to streptavidin-coated beads, the labeled antibody then binds creating a sandwich. The resulting complex is then measured. The more complexes that are created, the stronger the signal, i.e the more target analyte there is. Excess free biotin interferes by binding to the streptavidin-coated beads, leaving fewer binding opportunities for the antibodies. Antibody complexes that have successfully bound the analyze get washed away and are then undetected, resulting in falsely low results.

Competitive assays consist of an antibody to the analyte that is labeled with biotin. The analyte must compete for antibody binding sites with a reagent that is a supplied version of itself with a label for detection. If no analyte is present, the reagent occupies all the antibody binding sites and the complex is captured by streptavidin, and a strong signal is emitted. If analyte is present, that occupies antibody binding sites that outcompete the labeled reagent. When analyte is present, there is less detection and less signal measured. It is an inverse relationship. When analyte is not present, there is a strong signal detected, when analyte is present, there is a weak signal detected. Free biotin sticks to the streptavidin, leaving fewer antibody binding sites for the analyte:antibody or reagent:antibody complex. The complexes get washed away and causes weakening of the signal. This may give the impression that analyte is present, even in its absence.

This is an ongoing issue and the FDA advises the healthcare community; patients and physicians both to disclose any supplements that are being taken that contain biotin. Physicians should advise laboratory if interference from biotin is a possibility. Practice should be implemented to counsel patients to abstain from oral biotin 2-3 days before blood tests. Biotin has a rapid half-life of 2 hours, but patients taking mega-doses (>30 mg) have demonstrated interference on laboratory tests for up to 24 hours.

Physicians should educate patients to increase awareness of biotin interference. Adverse health effects can occur if test results are falsely skewed in any direction.