Erythropoietin (EPO)

The role of red blood cells is to carry oxygen. Just like anything in the body, this is tightly regulated by a mechanism that monitors whether or not there is adequate oxygen getting to tissues and other cells. Hypoxia is detected by the peritubular fibroblasts of the kidneys which causes erythropoietin (EPO) to be released. The EPO gene has a hypoxia-sensing region in its 3’ regulatory component which causes hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor to be assembled and it interacts with the 3’ enhancer of the gene causing increased EPO mRNA and production of more EPO.  EPO is a true hormone, being produced in the kidneys, and acting upon another distant location being the bone marrow. When EPO binds to its ligand (receptor) on red blood cell progenitors it initiates a cascade which is mediated through the JAK2 signal transducers which ultimately effects the gene expression. EPO has three main physiological effects on the body; it allows early release of reticulocytes from the bone marrow, prevents apoptosis, and reduces the time needed for cells to mature in the bone marrow before release into the periphery. 

There are two mechanism for which EPO stimulates early release of red cell precurors into the bone marrow. It induces changes in the adventitial cell layer of the marrow sinuses that increases the width of the spaces that the red cells squeeze out of. It also down regulates red blood cell surface receptors for adhesive molecules that are located on the bone marrow stroma. As a result the red cells are able to pass through without the receptor so that they won’t bind to the stroma and delay release.

Apoptosis is programmed cell death. EPO inhibits apoptosis by removing the induction signal. Under normal physiology the bone marrow produces more CFU-Es than needed that are stored in the bone marrow which have a “head start” in the maturation process. About a 10 day head start in maturation. The CFU-Es (Colony-forming unit-erythroid) are red blood cell progenitor cells that develop from BFU-Es (Burst-forming unit-erythroid). Both BFU-E and CFU-E are red blood cell progenitor cells that develop into the pronormoblast, which is the first morphologically identifiable red blood cell precursor. If healthy, those cells live out there life span and undergo apoptosis. If there is a deficiency of red blood cell mass, those cells undergo maturation to be released, while simultaneously the apoptosis induction signal is inhibited. The normal death signal consists of a death receptor being FAS, on the membrane of the earliest red blood cell precursors (CFU-Es/BFU-Es), and FASL ligand on the maturing red blood cells precursors. When EPO levels are low, because there is adequate oxygen delivery the older FASL bearing cells cross-link with earlier FAS precursors which stimulates apoptosis. EPO is able to subdue apoptosis by stimulating the more mature precursors to be released from the marrow, especially in times of hypoxia. At which point there will no FASL bearing cells to cross-link the early FAS bearing precursors. Its a two fold effect, the more mature cells are released to help increase red cell mass in times of need, and the early precursor are allowed to mature and be released without undergoing apoptosis. When EPO binds to its ligand on the red blood cell activates the JAK2-STAT pathway, which ends in and up-regulation of transcription for BCL-2, which is an anti-apoptotic protein. This anti-apoptotic protein rests on the cell membrane and prevents the release of cytochrome c, which initiates apoptosis. 

JAKSTAT

EPO has an effect on the bone marrow transit time of a red blood cell precursor in two different ways; increased rate of cellular processes, and decreased cell cycle times. What this means is that EPO stimulates synthesis of red cell RNA, such as the production of hemoglobin. It also stimulates the production of egress-promoting surface molecules within the bone marrow which allow the red blood cells to flow through the marrow easier. EPO stimulates cells to enter cell cycle arrest earlier than normal, and as a result, spend less time maturing and are able to be released. These cells may appear larger in size and have a bluish tinge to their cytoplasm because of this.

Advertisements

Donath-Landsteiner Antibodies

The history of the DL antibody goes back to the 1900’s. It was one of the first recognized forms of immune mediated hemolysis and responsible for inducing Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria (PCH). PCH is a transient condition, meaning that it comes on when immunoglobulins (Antibodies) are formed in response to a viral, bacterial, or spirochete infection. Its history will suggest that there is an association between PCH and syphilis. In over 90% of the cases of PCH in early history, the patient was co-diagnosed with syphilis. Throughout the 1900’s the condition began to evolve and is now seen most commonly in children following some sort of infection. Although it should be noted that PCH is not limited to those of adolescent age. So what really is the Donath-Landsteiner antibody and how does it contribute to PCH?

Clinical Presentation

Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria (PCH) is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Autoimmune meaning that they are antibodies that have cross-reacted to attack the individuals own cells. Hemoglobinuria means that there will be hemoglobin present in the blood, which suggests intravascular hemolysis. PCH is one of the more common intravascular hemolytic anemias. Typical patients present with fever, chills, abdominal and back pain, and pronounced hemoglobinuria. PCH typically presents in children following and upper respiratory infection or immunization. These patients often have a rapidly progressing anemia with hemoglobins that can fall as low as 2.5 g/dL. Peripheral blood smears show significant red blood cell agglutination and anisocytosis and poikilocytosis. Anisocytosis indicating variance in size of the red blood cells and poikilocytosis indicating variance in structure to the red blood cells. Schistocytes, spherocytes, and polychromasia are common findings. The spherocytes and polychromasia are indicative of the bone marrow trying to replenish the red cell population as best it can so it forces out immature erythrocytes into the peripheral blood. Its an effort to sustain the hemoglobin as best it can. One distinguishing peripheral blood smear finding in patients with PCH is erythrophagocytosis. Lets break this word down. Erythro- short for erythrocyte meaning red blood cells. Phagocytosis is mediated by neutrophils and monocytes as a way to kill foreign pathogens. In the case of erythrophagocytosis in PCH, neutrophils are characteristically seen engulfing red blood cells, which is diagnostic for AIHA.

The Donath-Landsteiner Antibody

The DL antibody, although being recognized as an cold autoantibody, is an IgG antibody that has developed P antigen specificity and it is a biphasic hemolysin. What that means is that when someone has the DL antibody and is exposed to cold temperatures, it will bind to the individuals red blood cells through the P antigen, but does not cause hemolysis until the coated red blood cells are heated to 37 degrees Celsius as they (RBC:antibody complex) travel from the peripheral fingertips and toes to the core of the human body.   At cold temperatures, the IgG molecule is able to recruit complement (C3), and at the higher temperatures, activates the membrane attack complex (C5-C9) and lyses the red blood cells. One very interesting piece of information regarding the difference between Cold Agglutinin Syndrome (CAS), another autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by Anti-I, is that the hemolysis from PCH is stronger and more severe because of the DL antibodies ability to detach from lysed red blood cells and reattaching to other cells. 

Laboratory Diagnosis

There are a few different ways to pinpoint PCH in the blood bank. One is by use of a Direct Coombs test (DAT). This test provides information regarding the type of hemolysis, whether it be acquired or inherited. It also tests for antibodies that have are bound in vivo. The most common DAT result in PCH is red blood cells coated with C3d causing a positive reaction. This is sensitive in 94-99% of cases. The other way to diagnosis DLAIHA (Donath-Landsteiner Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia) is by the indirect DL test. This process involves collection of a fresh serum specimen that is strictly maintained at 37 degrees Celsius from collection all the way through to testing. If the sample is allowed to cool or is refrigerated, there could potentially be autoadsorption of the DL anti-P antibodies onto the patients autologous red blood cells. This could cause a false negative result. Upon testing, the patients serum is mixed with P antigen positive, group O red blood cells, and fresh donor serum. The fresh donor serum is added because the complement level within the patients may be low due to consumption. The patient and donor serum mixture is incubated in a melting ice bath (O degrees Celsius) for 30 minutes, then warmed to 37 degrees Celsius for one hour. The specimen is then centrifuged and examined for hemolysis. If hemolysis is present then this constitutes a positive result for DL antibody.

Indirect-Donath-Landsteiner-test-Tube-1-OP-red-cells-suspension-patients-serum

Indirect DL test: As you can see in tubes 1 and 4, the presence of hemolysis indicates a positive test result for the DL antibody.

Treatment

There is unfortunately no cure for PCH, and very little reliable treatment options for those with the DL antibody. It is recommended to avoid cold climates as much as possible and when inside to have the temperature at 30 degrees Celsius to keep the hemoglobinuria low. This doesn’t treat the PCH, but it will minimize the recurrence and induced anemia. Steroids have been through extensive trials for treatment of PCH and there are mixed results. Theory is that steroids are better at clearing red blood cells coated with IgG, and less effective at clearing red blood cells that are coated with complement. More aggressive treatment such as splenectomy and Rituximab, which is an monoclonal antibody that targets the transmembrane protein CD20 present on B cells has been found effective for those patients with refractory PCH.

Iron Deficiency and Microcytic Anemias

Iron is an essential element for oxygen transport within hemoglobin. Oddly enough it is the element that is missed the most in regards to adequate intake and proper nutrition. Over 1.62 billion people in the world are effected by anemia, which is most commonly caused by iron deficiency. Iron deficiency can be caused by chronic blood loss, and is most common in women and teenagers from loss of blood due to menses. Iron loss leads to increased fatigue and depression, pallor, and dry and splitting hair. It can also lead to confusion cognitive effects. Hemoglobin is made of four polypeptide chains, two of which are alpha, and two are beta that come together to form a tetramer heme group with iron located in the middle. Ferrous iron within each heme molecule reversibly binds to one oxygen molecule. With iron deficiency, there becomes a hemoglobin deficiency. A decreased hemoglobin lowers oxygen-carrying capacity leading to anemia. Anemia by definition is a reduced oxygen-carrying ability. Tissue hypoxia can wreak havoc on almost every cell of the body, and can shift the oxygen dissociation curve in an unfavorable direction. The structure of hemoglobin and its function and key elements can be reviewed here.

To understand iron deficiency its important to recognize important aspects of iron metabolism and transportation in cells. Review the Iron Absorption and Metabolism article here for that information. There are also laboratory values that give a good picture of the iron status within the body that one should pay attention to. Transferrin; which is measured as the total iron binding capacity (TIBC) indicates how much or how little iron is being transported throughout the body. Serum iron is an important indicator of the tissue iron supply, and finally serum ferritin gives a picture of iron storage status within the bone marrow and cells.

Iron Deficiency Anemia

There are three stages within iron deficiency. Each comes with their own classic picture of laboratory results and worsen from stage to stage. In the first stage, there is storage iron depletion. This is mild and the patient may not even feel a difference physically. The patients hemoglobin is normal, normal serum iron, and TIBC. There is however decreased ferritin which indicates that there is decreased storage of iron. The second stage of iron deficiency is characterized by transport iron depletion. The hemoglobin may or may not be abnormal, but there is increased TIBC, and decreased serum iron. An increased TIBC, means that there are more substrate (iron) binding spots within the transferrin molecule. This implies that less iron is binding, which when coupled with a decreased serum iron makes sense. The patient may experience mild anemia which comes with increased fatigue and pallor. A peripheral blood smear will most often start to exhibit anisocytosis and poikilocytosis. These reference indicators represent abnormal sized red cells and abnormal shaped red blood cells respectively. A good indicator is an increased RDW, an increased RDW indicates some degree of anisocytosis. This is accurate because the red blood cell is realizing the loss of this oxygen-carrying capacity so its trying to release red blood cells as fast it can from the bone marrow to compensate for the loss, and as a result these red blood cells will appear smaller in diameter and hypochromic. Hypochromasia indicates that there is less hemoglobin within the cell and there is more of a central pallor. The thought is that even though there is less hemoglobin within each cell, if the bone marrow can produce more of these red blood cells than normal then that equals out. This leads to a microcytic anemia, micro meaning small. Stage three of iron deficiency is often referred to as functional iron deficiency. Within this stage there is an unmistakable decrease in hemoglobin, serum iron, and ferritin. There is also a large increase in TIBC.

The overall effect of iron deficiency anemia on the body and on the bone marrow is ineffective erythropoiesis. The red cell production within the bone marrow is compromised. As a result, the bone marrow becomes hypercellular with red cell precursors reducing the M:E (Myeloid:Erythroid) ratio.

Iron-deficiency_Anemia,_Peripheral_Blood_Smear_(4422704616)

This picture depicts how a peripheral blood smear would illustrate iron deficiency anemia. The red cells are smaller and there is more of a central pallor to them, indicating a loss of hemoglobin. This is also called hypochromia.

normalbloodsmear

This picture depicts a normal peripheral blood smear. The red blood cells are larger in size and they have more color to them.

Anemia of Chronic Disease

Anemia of chronic disease is another form of microcytic anemia similar to iron deficiency anemia. It usually arises from a chronic infection or from chronic inflammation, but its also associated with some malignancies. A buildup in inflammatory cytokines alters iron metabolism. IL-6, which is an inflammatory cytokine inhibits erythrocyte production. It also increases hepcidin production. Hepcidin blocks iron release from the macrophages and the hepatocytes by down-regulating ferroportin. Without ferroportin there is no transportation of iron throughout the body and no production of hemoglobin or red blood cells. Laboratory findings will usually demonstrate low serum iron, low TIBC, low transferrin, and an increased to normal ferritin. The reticulocyte count is also normal, and sometimes increased. Reticulocytes are released from the bone marrow in times of red cell shortages to compensate.

This is just a brief overview of iron deficiency anemia and other microcytic anemias. This is just the beginning, follow and look forward to more in-depth reviews of each microcytic anemia. Key differences to look for is the TIBC value. In iron deficiency anemia the TIBC is increased and in anemia of chronic disease the TIBC is decreased. Ferritin is increased in anemia of chronic disease because the stored iron can’t be released from cells and the bone marrow due to the increased hepcidin production. Also the degree of anemia is mild compared to the more severe iron deficiency anemia.

 

 

Aspirin as a blood thinner?

Most people who have had previous cardiac issues, those who have even had a minor heart attack or survived a major infarction have often been prescribed to take an aspirin daily. To tackle this issue, its important to understand what a heart attack or an infarction actually is. Usually blood travels to the lungs, it gets oxygenated, and then travels through the coronary arteries to oxygenate the heart muscle itself. People over time can develop plagues that thin the artery lumen, or opening, eventually to the point where only a small amount of oxygenated blood can actually pass through. As a result, the heart can’t keep itself oxygenated. Without oxygen, tissues become hypoxic and die. When they die they release toxic cytokines and chemicals that damage tissue further, which coincidently we can objectively measure to determine whether an individual has experienced a heart attack. Heart attacks can come from a deep vein thrombosis, or an emboli as well. In that scenario, the clot actually happens somewhere else in the body and a piece of it breaks off and circulates until it gets to the heart and blocks the blood flow in the heart, causing an infarct.

Aspirin works as a blood thinner. It impairs the bodies ability to form a clot. What is a clot formed out of? Platelets. So aspirin directly targets a precursor to thromboxane A2, which activates downstream signaling to aggregate platelets and form a clot in primary hemostasis.

Synthesis of TXA2

F1.large

The synthesis of thromboxane A2 is through the Arachidonic Acid, Cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Phospholipids are converted to Arachidonic Acid catalyzed by phospholipase C or phospholipase A2. Arachidonic acid can at that point go to two pathways; the Lipooxygenase pathway, or the Cyclooxygenase pathway. There are two Cyclooxygenase peroxidase; COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 mediates the pathway through which thromboxane A2 is going to be synthesized, and COX-2 mediates another pathway that works to synthesize prostaglandins which directly counteract the function of thromboxane A2. Its the bodies way of keeping homeostasis. For every action, there has to be an equal reaction. In the next step in the pathway, Arachidonic Acid is converted to Prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) by PGH2 synthase and COX-1/COX-2 working synergistically. Prostaglandin H2 is then converted to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) by thromboxane synthase. TXA2 is a vasoconstrictor and potent hypertensive agent.

So, how does aspirin come into play at all? Good thing you asked. Aspirin as it turns out irreversibly binds to COX-1. This antagonist effect stops the pathway and does not allow for the synthesis of thromboxane A2. Without TXA2, there will be no platelet aggregation, and no clot. Without primary hemostasis being established, coagulation, or secondary hemostasis, can’t take over to stabilize the clot with fibrin.

 

Polycythemia Vera

Polycythemia vera is an uncommon neoplasm or blood cancer where the bone marrow produces too many erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and granulocytes, resulting in panmyelosis. The cancer is caused by a mutation in the JAK2 gene. Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a role in signaling in the type II cytokine receptor family. Members of that family include interferon receptors, GM-CSF receptor family, gp130 receptors, and the single chain receptors (EPO-R, etc). The function of those receptors are not important. The most important receptor for this article is the EPO-R receptor. The erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) is a protein encoded by the EPOR gene that pre-exists in a dimerized state. When the ligand erythropoietin binds to the EPO-R receptor it induces a conformational change that results in the autophosphorylation of the JAK2 kinases. This establishes the function of EPO-R which is to promote proliferation and the rescue of erythroid progenitors from apoptosis. EPO-R induces JAK2-STAT5 signaling and with help from the transcription factor GATA-1 induces the transcription of the protein BCL-XL which is anti-apoptotic and promotes red cell survival.

In polycythemia vera (PV) there is a JAK2V617F mutation that causes independent continuous expression of the JAK2 kinase without erythropoietin (EPO) that acts on signaling pathways involving the EPO-R or hyperexpression in the presence of EPO. This causes increased gene expression for erythroid precursor cell proliferation and differentiation. It up regulates BCL-XL, which as mentioned above is an anti-apoptotic. This causes an abnormal accumulation of red cells in the peripheral blood. Its important to note that the accumulation of the red cells is due to lack of apoptosis, NOT because they are dividing quicker. Also there is a difference between primary PV and secondary PV. In primary PV there is a decreased expression of EPO, this is a compensation method for the body. As there is autophosphorylation of the EPO-Receptor, the body tries to reverse the process by down regulating the expression of erythropoietin (EPO). In secondary PV, there is normal to increased expression of EPO.

P-vera

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of PV according to the World Heath Organization (WHO) has to satisfy both major and minor criteria. The major criteria that has to be observed is a hemoglobin higher than 18.5 g/dL in men, and greater than 16.5 g/dL in women. There also has to be the presence of the JAK2 mutation. Minor criteria include presence of bone marrow hypercellularity demonstrating panmyelosis, serum EPO levels decreased, and a demonstration of endogenous erythroid colony growth in vitro. Meaning that there is presence of red cell growth in the laboratory using EPO from the patient, which assumes there is an issue with the downstream signaling of EPO, not EPO itself.

Laboratory results illustrate an increased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and MCV. There is an increased red cell count, platelet count, and white blood cell count. The leukocyte alkaline phosphatase is also increased. Its important to know that although the platelet count is increased, there is also an altered function of the platelets. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate will be decreased due to the decrease in the zeta potential. The zeta potential is the electrokinetic potential between the red cells that stops them from stacking or from sticking to one another. One classic characteristic of PV is erythromelalgia. This is a burning sensation in the pain and feet, with a reddish or bluish discoloration. This is caused by an increased platelet agglutination, from being dysfunctional that results in microvascular blood clots.

Treatment

If untreated, PV can be fatal. Although the disease can’t be cured, it can be controlled and the life expectancy has risen with modern advances in medicine. Phlebotomy is recommended to reduce the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, but can induce iron deficiency anemia if not monitored. Low dose aspirin is prescribed to reduce the risk of thrombotic events. The accumulation of the red cells increases the risk for the patient to develop thrombotic events because the blood is “thick”. Chemotherapy can be used, but is not normally indicated, unless therapeutic phlebotomy is unable to maintain a normal hemoglobin or hematocrit or when there is significant thrombocytosis. It is dangerous because of the risk for transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

To recap; its important to know the mutation in the JAK2 kinase that induces polycythemia vera. Although this mutation is demonstrated in 90% of cases, its possible that its absent. Panmyelosis and elevation of RBC indices is a diagnostic finding. Its important to know the major and minor criteria for the diagnosis of PV. Treatment is therapeutic phlebotomy and chemotherapy in rare cases, only when prior treatment has failed.